We all know the health benefits of swapping sugar filled drinks like soda for water, but sometimes water is, well, a little boring.

We don’t think there’s any reason to sacrifice flavor for health, and one of our favourite ways to stay hydrated is with fruit infused waters.

By adding fruits, veggies and herbs to your glass of water, you’ll not only stay hydrated, but you’ll also boost its nutritional and detoxifying benefits!

To make your infusions, simply throw the ingredients into a jug or large mason jar and for optimal flavor, allow to infuse for a few hours before enjoying.

You really can’t go wrong with fruit water infusions! Any fruit, veggie, and herb will deliver you great health benefits and a refreshing flavour.

Here are just some of our favourite recipes.

Lemon Water

The  Classic. Add ½ sliced lemon to your water for a gentle liver detox.

Cucumber Mint Water

This is the ultimate spa-like water infusion. Mint offers a light, refreshing flavor, and cucumber is great for helping to release water retention and bloating. Add ½ sliced cucumber and 10-15 mint leaves to a jug of water.

Basil Strawberry Orange Water

Like a fruit salad in your water! Add 6 sliced strawberries, ½ sliced orange, and a handful of basil to a jug of water.

Watermelon Lime

Like cucumbers, watermelon is super hydrating and wonderful for helping with water retention. Add ¾ cup watermelon and 1 sliced lime to a jug of water.

Berry Pomegranate Water

For a major antioxidant boost, make a berry and pomegranate infusion. Add ½  cup of each berry of choice and ½ cup pomegranate seeds to a jug of water.

For an extra nutritional boost, make your infusions with coconut water instead of tap water! Coconut water is full of electrolytes, which will keep you hydrated on those hot summer days, and they are (fingers crossed, Halifax) right around the corner.

 


Kate Horodyski is a Halifax-based freelance writer and wellness blogger. You can find her online on My Spiritual Roadtrip and on Instagram, @myspiritualroadtrip.

 

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